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Aug232010

Washington State Cesarean Rates by Hospital, 2009

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By Jill—Unnecesarean

 

 

 

Hospital Name

City

Total C/S

Total Births

C/S Rate

Mid-Valley Hospital

Omak

107

261

41.0%

Evergreen Hospital Medical Center

Kirkland

1551

4080

38.0%

Overlake Hospital Medical Center

Bellevue

1547

4109

37.6%

Providence Centralia Hospital

Centralia

246

654

37.6%

Grays Harbor Community Hospital

Aberdeen

225

603

37.3%

University Of Washington Med Ctr

Seattle

821

2201

37.3%

Pullman Regional Hospital

Pullman

128

346

37.0%

Auburn Regional Medical Center

Auburn

340

958

35.5%

Providence Sacred Heart Med Ctr

Spokane

992

2797

35.5%

Valley Medical Center

Renton

1339

3865

34.6%

Capital Medical Center

Olympia

240

694

34.6%

Cascade Valley Hospital

Arlington

141

413

34.1%

Whidbey General Hospital

Coupeville

55

162

34.0%

Swedish Medical Center - First Hill

Seattle

2436

7316

33.3%

Legacy Salmon Creek Hospital

Vancouver

643

1969

32.7%

Highline Community Hospital

Burien

309

950

32.5%

PeaceHealth Saint Joseph Hospital

Bellingham

645

1999

32.3%

Valley General Hospital

Monroe

116

371

31.3%

Newport Community Hospital

Newport

30

96

31.3%

Lourdes Medical Center

Pasco

115

369

31.2%

Tacoma General Allenmore Hospital

Tacoma

956

3084

31.0%

PeaceHealth Saint John Medical Center

Longview

361

1165

31.0%

Kittitas Valley Hospital

Ellensburg

113

366

30.9%

Coulee Community Hospital

Grand Coulee

20

66

30.3%

Deaconess Medical Center

Spokane

568

1879

30.2%

Providence Regional Med Ctr Everett

Everett

1098

3674

29.9%

Stevens Healthcare

Edmonds

338

1134

29.8%

Kadlec Medical Center

Richland

699

2346

29.8%

Island Hospital

Anacortes

115

386

29.8%

Sunnyside Community Hospital

Sunnyside

157

529

29.7%

Harrison Memorial Hospital

Bremerton

563

1899

29.6%

Providence Saint Mary Medical Center

Walla Walla

169

572

29.5%

Saint Joseph Medical Center

Tacoma

1083

3683

29.4%

Northwest Hospital

Seattle

303

1047

28.9%

North Valley Hospital

Tonasket

15

52

28.8%

Good Samaritan Hospital

Puyallup

625

2202

28.4%

Skagit Valley Hospital

Mount Vernon

380

1356

28.0%

Providence Saint Peter Hospital

Olympia

629

2251

27.9%

Othello Community Hospital

Othello

176

635

27.7%

Saint Francis Hospital

Federal Way

367

1366

26.9%

Olympic Medical Center

Port Angeles

128

483

26.5%

Lake Chelan Community Hospital

Chelan

28

106

26.4%

Providence Saint Joseph’s Hospital

Chewelah

17

65

26.2%

Prosser Memorial Hospital

Prosser

88

338

26.0%

Mason General Hospital

Shelton

71

273

26.0%

Central Washington Hospital

Wenatchee

365

1407

25.9%

Skyline Hospital

White Salmon

16

62

25.8%

Samaritan Hospital

Moses Lake

271

1075

25.2%

Southwest Washington Medical Center

Vancouver

829

3302

25.1%

Morton General Hospital

Morton

8

32

25.0%

Whitman Hospital & Medical Center

Colfax

10

40

25.0%

Walla Walla General Hospital

Walla Walla

67

269

24.9%

Jefferson Hospital

Port Townsend

31

127

24.4%

Group Health Central Hospital

Seattle

417

1712

24.4%

Forks Community Hospital

Forks

23

97

23.7%

Kennewick General Hospital

Kennewick

343

1455

23.6%

Providence Holy Family Hospital

Spokane

288

1239

23.2%

Enumclaw Community Hospital

Enumclaw

52

228

22.8%

Okanogan-Douglas Hospital

Brewster

42

193

21.8%

Providence Mount Carmel Hospital

Colville

38

185

20.5%

Valley Hospital and Medical Center

Spokane

101

527

19.2%

Toppenish Community Hospital

Toppenish

91

516

17.6%

Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital

Yakima

520

3098

16.8%

Yakima Regional Med & Heart Ctr

Yakima

0

1

0.0%

Willapa Harbor Hospital

South Bend

0

2

0.0%

 

 

24605

80837

30.4%

 

SOURCE: 2009 Full Year CHARS Standard Reports, Hospital Census and Charges by DRG, http://www.doh.wa.gov/ehsphl/hospdata/CHARS/Default.htm

Cesarean rates calculated by dividing total cesarean deliveries by total deliveries. 

 

2009 Fact Sheet: Controlling C-section growth (Washington State Department of Social and Health Services- pdf)
 

 

Thank you to SereneDoulas.com and Tranquil Haven Day Spa.


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Reader Comments (11)

I truly do not understand why there is such a HUGE difference between Yakima (good job!) and little Omak (scary!). Are the women truly that different? Or is it because Yakima still supports VBACs and Omak has banned them? Craziness. Can't even believe they can get away with this crap.

August 24, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterRoxanne

I'm going to go out on a limb here. I could be totally wrong, but I bet location/geography has something to do with it. Historically, a smaller town meant less access to epidurals, etc. and an anesthesiologist, which meant smaller hospitals usually had a lower c-section rate. Now, with lawsuits, etc. they probably schedule c-sections more (especially when they know when they will need an anesthesiologist). I wonder, what percentage of their c-sections are done without a trial of labor? Which ones are repeat c-sections without a TOL?

Also, I did read this link from another source and they said Puget Sound had the highest c-section rate at around 60 percent. I wonder - if you look at the map, Puget Sound (I've never been there) is surrounded by water, which means a substantial ferry ride to get to the mainland. It also has limited access with one major and one minor highway. If you're in labor and have to depend on either a ferry ride or one of two roadways to get to a hospital, heavy traffic, holiday season, blah blah blah I bet your doctor is going to suggest an induction - which may contribute to that 60 percent c-section rate - or just go to a scheduled c/s without even going into labor first and "taking a chance." I'd be curious if that were the reasoning behind it.

August 24, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterThe Deranged Housewife

Wow, we have great rates here in Yakima! It's kind of crazy because there are NO independent childbirth education classes in this area (yet!). And the closest homebirth midwife is in Prosser, about an hour away, so our options are pretty limited. I wonder if the lack of alternatives keeping all low risk women in the hosptial makes the hosptial c-section rates lower, since they have low risk women who could have given birth at home or in a birth center included? The general culture here is relatively pro-natural childbirth compared to other places I've lived (Provo, Utah...) I know a lot of people who have had natural births. I don't know how long epidurals have been available here. Probably recently enough that a lot of the medical personnel are more supportive of natural birth and alternative pain relief methods. My own experience with a hospital birth here was wonderful. I have heard that VBACs tend to be discouraged, though Yakima Valley Memorial does do them (Toppenish doesn't, so women who want one down there have to come up to YVMH) Oh, and Yakima Regional doesn't have an L&D department...interesting that they still had one birth--must have been somebody who walked in to the ER pushing.

Thanks for posting these!

August 24, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterBirth Unplugged

HI Birth unplugged, can you please email me at newmommy604@yahoo.com ? I live in Wenatchee (central Washington hospital has banned VBACS), and am trying to figure out my options for a 2nd VBAC (due in April). Wondering about Yakima. I drove to Spokane last time, but my labor was only 5 hours, and I'm scared to drive that far this time! ;) Thanks!

August 24, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterRoxanne

Every hospital has their own unique web of VBAC and birth politics, staff, and patient base. These things all contribute to the range in c-section rates among seemingly similar locations and demographics. Yes the large, urban, university or tertiary hospitals often have a disproportionate amount of high-risk births, but in some areas these hospitals may also have the lowest c-section rates in town -- as was the case when I was practicing in Albuquerque.

August 24, 2010 | Unregistered Commentererinmidwife

The Puget Sound is not an island, it's called that as a designation of a specific part of Washington. There are some small Islands, sure, like the San Juan Islands and also Camano Island. But honestly I've lived here and traveled around the state for 27 years and have never had a 'can't get to the mainland' type of thing. There is no 'mainland'- this is a normal state just like any other that happens to have a little more water. I can take an hour ferry ride to Seattle or hop in my car and drive about as long and also get there. Although there would never really be a need since I have 2 large hospitals within 15 minutes of me and also a Trauma hospital with a world class NICU less than 45 minutes away. The high c-sect rates in WA are disgusting and particularly in the puget sound. It's like, what has to happen for things to change?

August 24, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterDiana

Diana,
We have a similar area where I live - a small island that has one access on and off. In the event of accidents, it is a nightmare because you have such limited access.

I did wonder, though, if for some in the area might be convinced to just go ahead and schedule ahead of time if they are seemingly more remote than people who live 'on the mainland,' as I've heard it called. I don't know what the demographics are of the area - an even mix, wealthy and more educated, mostly retirees or whatever - any excuse, basically! *sigh*

August 24, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterThe Deranged Housewife

Here we have tons of access in and out of the puget sound area. The bridge alone has several lanes of traffic each way. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tacoma_Narrows_Bridge . There are also tons of ferry boats and different take off locations. To my knowledge we've never had a situation where people were stuck and couldn't get where they needed to go. On September 11th I couldn't get back to Seattle by ferry for college for a few days, but in a labor situation it wouldn't have mattered since this side of the water has many birthing hospitals available, too.
Something interesting that I have noticed about the puget sound is that some women are scheduling inductions or c-sects because a spouse is military and will be leaving soon (the puget sound is a military area). This is of course very controversial. I feel that the safety of the mother and baby should take priority but I also can't say how I'd feel knowing my spouse may not meet our child for 6-18 months- it must be very difficult. I've also had friends schedule a c-sect because the dr was going on vacation (!), they were 'tired of being pregnant', etc. Why this is acceptable in the medical community I don't understand.

The other friends of mine that have had c-sects were because high blood pressure, previous c-sects (and only one dr in my HUGE county will do a VBAC, it's crazy), and other things of that nature. We are surrounded more by hospitals I would say, than by water :) So it seems to be to not be an issue at all of the area and feasibility of access, but rather the dr's themselves and their acceptance of C-sects for non emergent reasons.

I had a cousin do a homebirth last month because she lives an hour from the military hospital and labors very quickly- I'd say that's a much better response than scheduling a c-sect :)
And a friend of mine had her baby in her car 4 months ago even though she only lived 15 minutes from the birthing center- just a very quick laborer!

August 24, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterDiana

One thing I'll point out -- not to defend or excuse, because these are ludicrously high, but just to point out -- is that there's a strong alternative birth culture in the Puget Sound region, which includes Seattle and its wealthy suburbs. There are several freestanding birth centers in the area, and there's a lot of homebirth. It's possible that a lot of the low-risk birth in this area (I live here) is happening outside of hospitals. My birth story (which you can read in the sidebar, under "My Awesome OB missed the first night of her family's vacation for me!") happened at Overlake, and Evergreen is the hospital that handles emergency transfers for the FSBC where I'm planning to have my current baby.

Like I said, they're still unacceptably high. But for folks wondering why the percentages are SO high in the urban Puget Sound reason. . . I honestly think that the strong alternative birth culture here might be a reason, because folks are more likely to only choose the hospital if they have a reason to.

August 25, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterKathryn T.

Seems about right. Had my two csections at the 2nd highest csection rate hospital and most of my csection friends also went there. Good portion of my vaginal birth friends went to Providence Everett, 25th highest.

August 25, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterAlisa
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